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Tag: Building

[Building] Toolmaker

With the copper from the mines, the Toolmaker can finally start his business and produce tools. These are required to train new Workers and Builders in the Guild House. Builders will construct buildings and roads while Workers occupy all resource and production buildings like the Fisherman’s Cot, the Sawmill or the Copper Mine. Make sure to build both buildings close to each other and do not wait too long to set up this supply chain.

The toolmaker can be upgraded twice, let us take a look at the different levels:

At Hamlet-Level, only a single Worker will be busy with producing copper tools.

At Village-Level, a second guy/girl joins, which will surely make worker number one rather happy. They will also be able to create iron tools now.

At Town-Level, there are three Workers producing tools for your settlers, and they can now create the most advanced steel tools too.

Iron and steel tools are required to construct buildings at Town- and City-Level.

With a growing settlement and an ever-increasing demand for tools, the Toolmakers will be quite busy throughout the whole game, so we need to make sure to supply him with resources all the time.

Keep in mind you will also need resources like copper and iron for other production chains.

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[Building] Copper Mine

Let’s take a first look at the heavy industry now by checking out the Copper Mine. Copper has to first be discovered on the map before we can mine it – afterwards it can be used by the Toolmaker to produce the tools required by our workers. As we reach Village-Level, copper can also be used to create copper coins, the cheapest currency we can create.

The mine and its upgrades are straightforward:

At Hamlet-Level a single miner will go out and mine copper.

At Village-Level he/she gets a colleague, therefore doubling the output.

At Town-Level a third workers joins and underground mining will become available.

At City-Level a fourth worker joins.

As you might imagine, no products are added with higher levels – a Copper Mine is focused on mining copper after all.

Not all copper deposits are located above ground. Those below the surface require a Tier 3 (Town-Level) Copper Mine to be exploited. We will need a Geologist to find the hidden deposits.

With the importance of tools for our settlement, we should definitely not neglect our copper production and try to find this resource as soon as possible. Without tools for our workers to occupy new buildings, our settlement will not be able to progress very far. Keep an eye out for additional copper deposits while expanding.

Copper coins will help us convince more people to join our settlement and ensure a steady population growth in the early game, as we mentioned in our Population dev-blog.

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[Building] Quarry

The construction of our settlement cannot run on wood and wooden boards forever, eventually we will need stone to construct more advanced and bigger buildings, roads and improved walls.

This means we will need to build a Quarry somewhere close to a stone deposit.

The Quarry requires a finished Townhall and therefore Tier 2 – Village-Level. It can be upgraded once.

At Village-Level, two Quarriers are gathering regular stone.

Town-Level supports three workers and unlocks access to another good: Limestone – which has its own deposit on the map.

While regular stone is needed for the construction of all buildings at town level and for stone wall fortifications, it also can be further processed. Stones can be crushed into gravel by the Stonebreakers Yard or made into cobblestone by the Stonemason. We’re going to introduce both buildings in detail at a later date.

Gravel is used to build gravel roads, which are needed to use donkey carts. If we instead want to use ox carts, which can carry the most goods at once, we will need to build paved roads with cobblestone.
Limestone itself cannot be used, but has to be processed by Stonebreakers Yard and made into cement, which is then used for the construction of most buildings at city level.

Together with the Woodcutter and the Sawmill these three buildings will soon become a central part of the resource production for our growing settlement; especially since advanced roads in combination with carriages allow for much faster transportation of goods across your realm.

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[Building] Hunter’s Cabin

The forests and fields of The Settlers are inhabited by various kinds of wild animals – this is where the Hunter comes into play.

The Hunter’s Cabin is a building, which secures another source of food for our settlement. In addition, leather can be gathered and later made, by a different building, into light armour.

As with most of our buildings, the Hunter’s Cabin can be upgraded, which allows our settlers to hunt for different kinds of animals.

At Hamlet-Level, a single Hunter is catching rabbits.

At Village-Level, a second worker joins and they are able to hunt boars.

Town-Level unlocks deer to be preyed on and allows our now 3 workers to also obtain leather.

The meat of the three different types of animals allows for different kinds of dishes. As you could see in our article about market stalls the meat from wild animals is handled separately from the meat of farm animals, which means we have the special Wild Game Stall for products from your Hunter offered at the marketplaces.

We can also decide if we want to hunt older animals only to preserve the population or if we want to get meat as fast as possible: Hunting too many animals or removing forests will eventually lead to them becoming extinct in that area, removing this food source from your options.

But the different animals will also eat resources like berries or young trees in the forest, which increases their population. While this means we can hunt more, the forest itself recovers slower or we harvest less berries in that place too. We need to take decisions on our best strategy how to use the resources we find.

The wild boars can become a plague, they even plunder our corn fields if they find them… and their population will further increase with such a feast. A trail in an unsecured forest can have some shiny things next to it, because angry boars can chase away your carriers or workers, and they will drop whatever they just carried and run away in panic. However, the hunter can get the situation under control, the boars try to get some distance when he walks around.

The leather, which is gathered from deer, can be further processed by the Tannery and made into leather armor, used by some of our soldiers. There is also an enhanced version bolstered by metal, which is called reinforced leather armor.

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[Building] Fisherman’s Cot

Next to building materials, food is an absolute necessity for our settlement so it’s important to set up this supply-chain as early as possible. One option is building a Fisherman’s Cot.

By observing the water near the coast or in a lake, we can easily figure out the best spot to build one, as the fishes will show their presence at times. One of our worker will then occupy the building and fish in a certain area of the coast – this area (the so-called focus point) can be moved.

By building a Townhall we will be able to upgrade the Fisher, let’s take a look at the different levels:

At Hamlet-Level only one fisher will go about his work, and fish salmon at the ocean.

At Village-Level two fisher can work simultaneously and will now be able to gather trout in lakes for advanced recipes.

At Town-Level another fisher will join the team and they are now able to catch some shrimp as well.

Different kinds of fish are used for different dishes prepared by our residents in the houses – as mentioned in our Food and Stamina blog. As with the Woodcutter, we are able to activate or deactivate certain kinds of goods, depending on our preferences. If the fisher is not getting food delivered, they can eat their own product, but the effect will be not as good as when consuming cooked food.

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[Building] Market Stalls

Since we focused on the Residences in the last blog, let us now look at the Market Stalls where our residents get all the ingredients for their tasty dishes.

There are several different Market Stalls, each for multiple different goods of a category, and in contrast to other buildings, they cannot be upgraded. Each of them is manned by a trader, who takes care of offering the ingredients to residents, while carriers take care of supplying the market stall with goods from the various production buildings.

In total there are 6 different market stalls:

The Forager’s Stall which is for Berries, Herbs & Mushrooms
The Fishmonger’s distributes all the different fish
The Wild Game Stall focuses on meat from the Hunter.
While the Butcher’s Stall is responsible for meat from the animal farms
The Baker’s Stall distributes Bread from the bakery as well as eggs from the animal farm
And at the Grocery our residents can get Corn & Vegetables from the farm

We don’t need to always build all Market Stalls in each settlement since we usually won’t have all food production buildings in the same area.

While fish is a good food source for our settlement near the sea or a lake, our other settlements further inland probably better focus on different ingredients and different recipes. This directly plays into the whole transportation topic because, as you might imagine, the best place to construct Market Stalls is close to residences to reduce transport times. Building multiple different market stalls close to each other also helps the residents to buy different ingredients at one place… and suddenly you have marketplaces using your preferred placement layouts in central key locations.

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[Building] Residence

We have covered residences before in one of our dev-blog before, namely the food and stamina system. Now want to take a closer look at its different levels and the advantages those bring.

Residences are central for our economy: Residents prepare food for our busy workers who will otherwise stop working. On the other hand, they also collect the ingredients for their meals at market stalls or food production buildings. Because of that, the connection and distances to the food supply, to the workers in production and to the resource buildings matter.

In order to cope with the increasing demand, as out settlements becomes bigger, we will need more houses and residents. Since building space is limited, upgrading residences is the way to go – especially since higher-level buildings unlock new recipes for dishes, which provide more stamina to our workers. Let us take a look at the different levels:

At Outpost-Level, one resident lives in the house and is responsible for supplying the buildings nearby. At this point, we only have access to the simplest meals, which only use 1 ingredient and just recover little stamina.

At Village-Level, a second resident moves in and basic recipes, which uses 2 ingredients, e.g. meat with corn, unlocks; these recover more stamina for our workers.

At Town-Level, the residence does not only start looking fancy, three people are now busy supplying our workers with delicious dishes. This level also unlocks even richer recipes using up to 3 ingredients, giving a wider variety of food to our hard-working settlers.

At City-Level, we have four residents delivering the most advanced and exotic meals to the production facilities nearby to keep up with the ever-increasing demand.

Depending on how we set up our economy, an upgraded residence can either supply more (lower level) buildings at the same time or supply the upgraded production buildings in their vicinity. The residents will automatically create the most advanced dishes they can cook, depending on our production and availability of the individual ingredients in their vicinity. More advanced dishes need more time to collect the ingredients; however, the residents still saves a lot of time by delivering the powerful combined meal.

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[Building] Sawmill

We have previously covered the Woodcutter so it makes sense to go one step further now and cover the Sawmill.

For the first basic buildings, we only need raw logs but soon we will need slightly more refined resources: wooden boards. One building requiring those is: The Townhall. Since this building enables further upgrades and also unlocks more advanced buildings, we want to get that Sawmill running after we’ve secured the very basic resource supplies and expanded our territory a bit.

The different levels allow for more craftsmen and additional products:

At Outpost-Level, one craftsman is busy sawing softwood trunks into softwood boards.

At Village-Level, another craftsman joins – and together they are now able to produce hardwood boards out of hardwood trunks.

At Town-Level, yet another craftsman will help.

Softwood boards are used to construct buildings; at village level, they already fully replace the softwood trunks. Hardwood is important to craft wooden weapons like bows and clubs, to craft vehicles in the wainwright like pull-carts or ox-carts and to repair the ships that set sail in the harbour. As with previously presented buildings, if we have a bottleneck we can have our craftsmen solely focus on one of the two goods: softwood or hardwood boards.

What’s your preferred approach to resource production? Always keeping production close to how much is needed and then reacting to shortages or aim for surplus production to have a buffer should anything unforeseen happen? Let us know in the comments!

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[Building] Woodcutter

Let’s continue our building overview series with one of the most important buildings for any The Settlers colony: the Woodcutter.

Our Settlers do bring some softwood and hardwood with them on the ship, but since all early construction-work requires it, we should quickly get our own softwood production going.

Every Woodcutter will cut down trees in a certain area around his work place and store the lumber in front of his hut. The target area, called focus point, can be moved, e.g. when wanting to focus on trees in a specific place. The gathered wood can then be used for construction or be further processed via the Sawmill.

As we discussed in our blog about the Townhall, all buildings can be upgraded to unlock various advantages – and the woodcutter is no exception:

At Outpost-Level there is one woodcutter working who is able to gather soft wood for the first basic buildings (Outpost-Level) and hard wood for weapon creation and to repair ships.

At Village-Level a second woodcutter will join to help and therefore speed up production.

At Town-Level the building will be supported by a third craftsman.

There are even more options of how the wood can be used. With the support of the Sawmill, softwood boards can be used for further building construction while hardwood is required to craft pull-carts for the carriers. The building menu allows us to prioritize: only cut softwood, only hardwood, or both. While more craftsmen speed up production, we need to keep in mind this will also increase the amount of food required.

You will also be able to decide if all trees should be cut or if the woodcutters should focus on older, fully-grown trees to preserve the forest. While shorter walking distances will boost your initial wood output, if you place many woodcutters and cut down too many trees the forest may not regrow fast enough and you will deplete it.

Please keep in mind the game is still in development, so certain functions or even the looks of buildings can still change.

With episode two of our buildings overview series done, which building would you like us to cover in one of the future blogs? Are there any additional info you would like to see in these articles? Let us know!

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[Building] Mint

In our new series “buildings information” we introduce and focus on the different buildings in The Settlers. The series covers the buildings’ purpose, what goods will be produced and needed and the different Tiers you can upgrade the building to.

We talked about the gatherer in our Townhall Blog and you heard about woodcutters and fishers, soo…let’s start with something else.

As presented in our Population Dev Blog, we need to convince additional settlers to join our new settlements by giving them coins. How do we get there? By building a Mint and produce them.

The Mint is available after we have built a Townhall and unlocked Tier 2 buildings. Our sheer amount of shiny coins will convince settlers in far-away places that our settlement is a great place to live.

The Mint starts at village level and can be upgraded twice, unlocking the option to produce higher value coins.

At village level, two workers will produce copper coins.

At town level, a third worker will join and they are able to produce silver coins additionally or instead.

At city level we have four workers producing coins and they are now also able to make valuable gold coins.

Early on, it will be enough to offer copper coins, but later we should produce first silver and then gold coins to attract more settlers. Due to the changing need of resources you might want to build new Mints closer to the respective resources – except if you’re lucky enough to find all three resources very close to each other.

That’s the first of many building introductions. Do you like this format? Is there anything else you’d like to know or do you have any suggestions on what we can do different in future articles? Let us know in the comments.

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